Changing Our Habits For The Greater Good

Ethical Leadership for all, and shifting our thoughts and actions in healthier, empowering ways that last

Art by Warwick Goble, 1920 PD.

CS Sherin, August 27, 2019

After I earned my MA degree in Servant Leadership in the Spring of 2006, one of the major lessons that stayed with me was the understanding that real change — the kind that is ethical and accountable, the kind that lasts — does not happen overnight — it takes time. For an ethical leader (and the average person seeking to change destructive habits and live more ethically), this means being dedicated to the best possible outcome and positive impacts for all involved. It also means caring more about long-term results than about immediate satisfaction. This requires thoughtful, engaged patience, and an understanding of the time and timing required for real, lasting change to be established and maintained over time.

Impatience, shortcuts, quantity over quality, greed, abuse of power and control, and leaning on loopholes and convenience ultimately degrade long-term progress, health, and sustainability. Although we may enjoy and see short-term progress by doing these things — in most cases, that kind of progress won’t last, and if it does, it will be riddled with compromises and harm to health, esteem, ethics, and healthy communication and systems.

For example, when we first bring a fish home to the aquarium, there may be an impatient desire to get the new fish into the aquarium right away. If we give in to that selfish impatience without gradually acclimating the fish to the new water and temperature, the fish can go into shock, become injured, sick, and/or die. Sometimes the shock and subsequent illness or injury from that initial impatience won’t be immediately visible — it may happen days later or a month later, but the harm was done. Taking the 30 minutes to 2 hours or longer, that a new fish may need to acclimate to the new environment makes all the difference.

So it is with cutting corners to achieve something — it can give the satisfaction of visual completion and short term satisfaction, but at what ultimate cost to integrity, quality, health, and future ability to thrive?

We also need to make space in order to fully evaluate and receive feedback on current: needs, communication, delegation, processes for feedback, efficiency, transparency; and inclusivity of processes, systems, and structures.

At the same time we need to take the time to evaluate ourselves (as leader, or leader of one’s own life) alongside the work, project, team, and/or organization. Ultimately, we cannot administrate, manage, or lead effectively — we cannot change destructive habits, and systemic problems — until we have addressed ourselves and our own inner workings honestly, and as objectively as possible. No matter how far we’ve come, the need for this practice remains true.

How can we, as ethical leaders/individuals, best serve our purpose, the people we work with, our teams and/or those in our care?

The leader sets the tone. The leader establishes what is acceptable and not acceptable by: tone, actions, style, methods, policies, presence, and follow-through. To effect real, positive, lasting change we must be willing to do the kind of work and collaboration that establishes new pathways in place of familiar, comfortable, dysfunctional ones. We must be willing to see systemic privilege, and to see past assumptions that run on autopilot.

The ethical leader asks, “How can I best serve my purpose, my employees, clients, and/or customers now, and for the long haul?” and “How can I create a healthy, thriving system that is sustainable, transparent, and ethical for the long haul?” The real answers require extra effort, time, and resources. The real answers also include knowing the importance of creating effective teams, supporting them, delegating with clarity, and then walking away with trust and knowing. Then, being free to address the big picture issues while the details are left in capable hands that report back.

There are many steps involved in getting to that point. Yet, the results? The results may not be evident right away. It depends on how healthy or not healthy things are to begin with. Yet, the payoff for long-term transformational change is: greater satisfaction, productivity, creativity with better results, and a system of collaboration that is strong and can last.

But how do we get there? We have to start with ourselves. All of this is applicable to each of us. We are the ethical leaders of our lives, or not. We are the administrators of our lifestyles and habits.

When we keep our standards high and inspiring, we have motivation to do better: personally, independently, and in collaboration. When we instill standards of healthy communication and effective, responsive accountability and pathways for it — we begin to build lasting systems for positive change. Even if we need to work quickly with intense deadlines, there are still ways to implement systems within culture and operations that are ultimately healthier, refreshing, sustainable, and invigorating for the long haul. We simply must stop and take the time to establish them, so that intense deadlines become an enjoyable, exciting challenge rather than hellish and draining.

All of this is applicable to each of us. We are the ethical leaders of our lives, or not. We are the administrators of our lifestyles and habits.

In the face of challenges and setbacks, the patience to grow real lasting change remains a core value for the ethical leader. The big picture is not lost, the big goal is kept central during setbacks. And, core motivation includes knowing that: facilitating healthy restoration of systems eventually translates into returns and legacies of lasting value. In this same way, each of us may apply these values and practices, in order to navigate and wield the authority of leadership for our own lives, and increasingly, in the best ways possible.

Begin With Yourself: Understanding Habits

This approach and these lessons are adaptable and applicable for most everyone. But where to start? We want to begin the long, demanding, and worthwhile, rewarding path by being aware of and changing our own habits and autopilot blind assumptions/norms. By beginning this process on the personal level, we may then effectively respond to changing needs, emergency situations, and a troubled human world and Environment in flux.

To do this, we must first grasp what habit really is. Creating a habit demands a considerable investment of our time and energy. Much like Artificial Intelligence requires tons of data in order to learn, grow and operate well — human habits are also established by tons of repetition and concerted effort in order to become autopilot functions.

“Habit” is defined as: “something done often and regularly; a behavior or action repeated regularly so as to have become automatic.” Some synonyms for habit include: routine, pattern/norm. The idiom, to be “on automatic pilot” can be defined as: “completing a task without awareness or thinking because it has been repeated so many times that the function is automatic.” With autopilot in this sense, the meaning also connotes a degree of unconscious, mindless behavior.

Many parts of operating and driving a vehicle become habitual — we go on autopilot with many aspects of driving. We also operate with a good measure of trust for the maps in our memories that help us to navigate in the area in which we live without much, if any, thought. It is much the same in navigating and operating within our homes and at work each day. Some of us have mental memory maps so well-defined and subtly present in our neural pathways that we can even walk with our eyes closed (or in the dark) and find our way around the house (or neighborhood) with little to no problems.

In “Primal Leadership” by Daniel Goleman, the author explains how habits form strong, rigid neural pathways in the brain. These pathways are solid and resistant to change. Yet, the author reported, it was discovered that those pathways can be altered and changed — however, it takes a lot of conscious effort and persistence to succeed in doing this. Repetition is the key to creating a habit (healthy, neutral, or destructive) and to set a more fixed pathway in the brain, and therefore, in one’s life. Anyone who has developed a somewhat destructive habit can attest to the effort and determination required in order to alter that habit.

Inner Peace Matters

Art by William Blake, circa 1790s PD.

One necessary component for making change that lasts is to achieve a complete sense of resolve about the change that is needed.

A resolute belief or motivation is the fuel that transforms a habit. Being free of any conflicting feelings or beliefs regarding the needed change is quite necessary, in order for any of the effort to succeed for the long-term. If even a quarter of our mind and/or heart is conflicted about changing the habit, the effort will most likely fail in the long-term. Most often, it would happen via subconscious and subtle sabotage, or a very conscious and clear defeated or jaded attitude.

People may turn to hypnotism and visualizations to undo self-sabotaging behavior that is resistant to the desire to change. Sometimes this is successful, sometimes it isn’t. Deep down, the knots must be untangled, with visualization and hypnotism, or through other methods and modalities. However it is done, the deeper issues of conflicted feelings, thoughts and beliefs regarding the habit must be found, faced, and resolved consciously.

Psychologists often say that a bad habit often continues because a person is gaining something from it, even when they say they want to stop. Perhaps an unconscious bit of the person likes the negative attention, or ties it to something learned in childhood. Sometimes, there is a hidden sentimentality, judgment, pride, or sense of entitlement attached, no matter how veiled. Whatever it is, we have to be willing to face and evaluate our own inner workings and inner saboteur as we seek to change habits and lifestyle for the better. It is essential that we search our own thoughts and feelings regarding any needed change that must take place. Right along with this searching, is prioritizing time to process issues, and to begin to enter into the needed change with deeper resolve.

During and after that, asking for feedback from honest and trusted others is also important. It is important to choose to hear feedback from those who will tell the truth, not what we want to hear — yet also those who care about us and want us to succeed in these positive changes. In this way, we gain perspective and new ideas. It is an ongoing practice of transparency and accountability — first in relationship to self, and then to others. Here is an example for perspective. Please read it both literally and figuratively:

Yard Restoration

I have moved into two different houses where the yards needed restoration. The first had been treated by pesticides for years, but had fertile soil, and lots to work with. It took about three years for the yard to fully recover — and became a thriving oasis of native plants and a refuge for wildlife. The second also had been treated for pesticides at one time, and the soil was greatly depleted and mostly sand. This yard has taken longer to recover, and still can’t fully recover without amending the soil. A big leap to lushness and progress was not evident until five years had passed. That being said, I am no expert in restoring yards, and I do the little by little approach in that regard. Additionally, this second yard hasn’t been a main priority like the other was. In aiming to restore the second yard — without expertise, or a lot of dedicated time, or a lot of invested money/resources — the long term results took longer.

Someone once told me that when they moved in to their new house, their yard had been treated yearly with pesticides as well. They took an intensive approach, investing resources into immediate change that would improve year after year. They had all the grass removed and planted clover as a ground cover instead of grass. This ground cover is organic and provides food for bees, and requires little, if any mowing.

While I didn’t immediately invest in overall change for the second yard, I did effect overall change in one way. Without pesticides and herbicides involved, I was able to allow pollinator ground cover to take over naturally. This took longer, yet it worked well. I allowed the plantain, clover, violets, and dandelions to spread, while planting native plants, and allowing them to propagate naturally as well.

Consciously Changing Habits

Art by Warwick Goble, 1920 PD.

In committing to needed change through ongoing self-reflection regarding thoughts, choices, and habits — we will be able to maintain a vivid and thriving approach that is more in tune with current and changing needs and realities. In addition, we are then able to be in tune more authentically to who we are, and who we are becoming. This can serve to boost confidence, mood, and motivation. This also then, translates into new ways of approaching leadership, management, care, and facilitation for others.

Our thoughts, once observed, reveal much. In observing and evaluating our thoughts, we see, little by little, or all at once — what we have left to autopilot each day. Most likely some of it will be unwanted, outdated, and perhaps even counter-productive to our well-being and most desired goals for life and work. Some of it may not even really be ours, but expectations and distorted voices that belong to other people (from the past or present), and that were put upon us. We can take that weight off once it is observed for what it really is.

After we make progress personally — re-shaping, discarding, and transforming some of our thoughts and habits — the ongoing approach remains the same. We begin by observing and evaluating our thoughts and actions each day. We maintain a list of questions for ongoing self-evaluation check-ins. Are we:

  • Contributing to positive long-term goals with our daily thoughts, habits, and actions?
  • Noticing and consciously choosing which thoughts are maintained?
  • Happy with our personal process and the results?
  • Noticing and addressing details, feelings, needs, inspiration? or ignoring them?
  • Noticing harmful elements, ingredients, or dynamics? or ignoring them?
  • Making the most of the choices available each day?
  • Allowing ourselves to remain in a rut of looped thoughts?
  • Allowing ourselves new options, new thoughts, new approaches?

With ongoing discernment regarding our thoughts, habits, and daily actions — we are instilling healthy, conscious pathways that can better empower ourselves and others. Another example for this process is my book, Recipe For A Green Life. It is a complete guidebook for this kind of holistic process, focusing on lifestyle and sustainability.

All of this requires a dedication to some amount of life-long learning. Finding pleasant ways to maintain interest and curiosity regarding the “who, what, when, where, how, and why” of anything we are choosing and putting our energy into is most helpful. Personal choices (at home, at work, and beyond) — from the smallest, and most overlooked, to the biggest — all matter, to some degree, and at some level. Start small, start big — start however this all works best for you, and continue in whatever ways and at the pace that allows you to keep going in the right direction. Consistently showing up in this way helps us to more easily stay current and healthy, and more primed to facilitate the process for others too.

Truth Telling

It can be, and is important that we share our process and discoveries (when we can, and as appropriate) with straightforward honesty, integrity, and reasonable kindness. Sometimes the truth is ugly though. Do we wrap it in kindness? Whenever possible, yes. Still, absolute gentleness at all times is not possible or realistic. There are exceptional times when even kind honesty can feel harsh. And there are times when being too kind and too forgiving is a disservice to ourselves and others.

The standard mode of operation for the ethical leader is: to establish trust with honesty, that is upheld by integrity and kindness. Even better, if that honesty, integrity and kindness is accompanied by impartial ethics and wisdom, which remain unswayed by status or privilege. Being a truth-teller can make us very lonely at times, especially when others are playing games, and don’t want to play fair or to be healthy. However, as a leader, being a truth-teller is the highest calling. And ultimately, that is rewarded with connections and teams of integrity and advanced skills. That is what takes us to the next level. And, that is why the ethical leader must be a truth-teller — and with values for kindness, integrity, and impartial wisdom at the helm. This comes from having lived it — by having the ongoing practice of self-evaluation that creates the integrity in the first place.

By dedicating ourselves to this considerable, yet worthwhile and rewarding effort, we make progress in real time, and that grants us a warranted hope in momentum and strength, which is gained by right action.

May we all go forward more mindfully, shifting to more healthy, productive habits and leadership on all levels. May these new and healthier collective thoughts, habits, and right actions increase exponentially, and dynamically contribute to a great healing and new positive pathways for the future and all life on Earth.

Photography: California Vacation, Part Four ~ Finale

CS Sherin, August 22, 2019

This will conclude the photographic highlights from our Bay area vacation this past July. It has been so much fun sharing and revisiting these moments in time.

The following photos are from some of my favorites places (already shared in parts 1-3, but from different angles), and some places and things that haven’t been shared yet.

As always, if you see any photos (or art images) on this site that you would like to blow up as art for your walls, please contact me to order a custom, high resolution, archival quality print. Likewise, if you would like to purchase a digital copy for your personal or business use.

San Francisco:

Chinatown, San Francisco, CA, July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

The view from Portsmouth Square, Chinatown, SF. Photo by CS Sherin

SF Ferry Terminal, July 2019. There was a festival for Bastille day going on, and also an outdoor Farmers Market.

Land’s End trail view of the Bay, and the Golden Gate Bridge on the horizon, July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

Along Highway One, State Beaches:

View from the top of a trail overlooking a part of the beach below. Gray Whale Cove State Beach, CA; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

Ocean time at San Gregorio State Beach, CA; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

Drift wood structures on San Gregorio beach, July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

Santa Cruz:

Adorable spotted seagull chicks on a separate, protected part of the pier in Santa Cruz, CA; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

Sea lions consider the areas below the Santa Cruz pier to be their home base. They talk a lot, swim, sleep, and lounge together; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

The historic (created in 1907) beach Boardwalk Amusement park of Santa Cruz, CA.

Sea birds of Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, CA; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

That’s it for now. I hope you enjoyed this photo journey with me. Thank you so much for stopping by!


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Photography: California Vacation, Part Three

CS Sherin, August 14, 2019

A slice of a fallen redwood with dated rings, at the entrance to the trails at Muir National Monument in Mill Valley, CA; July 2019. “909 AD tree is born…1930 tree falls.”

It was a beautiful day this past July when we drove up to Mill Valley from the Bay Area in order to visit Muir National Monument, aka Muir woods, where some of the ancient redwoods have been protected as a National Park by Sierra Club founder, John Muir, since 1908.

Looking up at a congregation of ancient redwood trees bathed in sunlight, July 2019, Muir National Monument (Muir Woods State Park). Photo by CS Sherin

We were enthralled with the forest that is home to countless ancient trees (the oldest in these woods is at least 1200 years old, and redwoods can live well over 2000 years old) as well as so many groves of baby redwoods. The tallest redwoods in this forest are almost 300 feet tall. Further north they get to be closer to 400 feet tall. We spent over four hours simply hiking the trails there, from top to bottom, and all around. While there wasn’t overwhelming evidence of wildlife, the further we got from the crowds of people below on the walking trail, we did encounter tiny birds, a curious chipmunk, and ravens flying silently above us.

My daughter, Samara, inside and beneath a mammoth redwood. July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

Being among the tallest and oldest trees I have ever seen, for a short while, was a beautiful experience. I experienced it as an atmosphere of complete goodness, as if the ancient rootedness exudes an aura of deep peace, and contentment ripples outward.

Towering giants of Muir woods, July 2019, Mill Valley, CA. Photo by CS Sherin

Giant clover, the main ground cover along the floor of the redwood forest in Muir National Monument, July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

The ground cover, amazingly, was mostly a bigger than usual kind of clover. I would say that it is 3- times bigger than the clover leaves I am accustomed to. Since Wild Clover is my brand name, I have to say, it meant a lot and surprised me to see the clover there. No one talks about the giant clover dressing the ground around the ancient giants in northern California, and I completely understand why that detail would be lost. As I spoke about this with a fellow writer and friend, it pleased our humor when I mentioned that perhaps the average wild clover would be inspired to become giant among such companions towering above. My friend suggested that perhaps they are, in fact, aspirational clover. This made us laugh happily. Brilliant!

Here I am stretching up to photograph the upward view, beside Samara, July 2019. Photo by Jeff Sherin

After coming back to the Midwest’s Driftless area, the trees here who stand the tallest and oldest now look like children to us, because of the tree world scale we now know. It is a strange and welcome awareness.

Impossibly tall redwood trees leave us feeling smaller than I felt the first time we walked through Manhattan; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

Most of all, I come away from Muir woods with, first, a deep sense of gratitude for National and State parks and beaches. Second, and just as deeply, I am thankful that the redwoods and other ancient and giant beings still exist in this world. At times, all the destruction being waged against many things — including health, biodiversity, and nature — overwhelms.

My first encounter with these giants has left me with a sense that some great natural magic of this world is and has been protected.

From that deep gratitude, I say to you and all: may we arise from the current attacks by hatred and corruption upon many fronts — stronger, wiser, and with greater measures of caution, restoration, and protection for all that is precious, naturally magical, and irreplaceable in this world and life.

This is not quite the conclusion of the California Vacation photography series! Stay tuned next week for the conclusion. 🙂


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Photography: California Vacation, Part Two

I have always wanted to see northern California. This past July, that wish was fulfilled. We were able to rent a Prius via Turo, and drove all around the Bay area, from Mill Valley and Sausalito, to Berkeley, Oakland, and San Francisco, and then back and forth along Highway 1, and down to Santa Cruz. It was an adventure I would happily repeat. Even the driving across a 7 mile bridge (San Mateo-Hayward bridge) was okay, because on either side is such beauty to be in and explore.

Last week’s Part One highlighted some closeups I captured at the state beaches. Today, I will highlight some of the vistas and grandeur:

The morning was misty and cool at Gray Whale Cove State Beach, CA and the surfers were out. Photo by CS Sherin

The mist was still hanging on around lunch time, at San Gregorio State Beach, CA.
Photo by CS Sherin

Standing at the top of a trail above part of San Gregorio beach in the afternoon.
Photo by CS Sherin

On another cool and blustery morning, Shark Fin Cove (along Hwy 1, CA, near Santa Cruz) was wondrous as seen from the trail above. Photo by CS Sherin

The shape that gives it the name — Shark Fin Cove; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

A beautiful view of the flowered hills above Pescadero State Beach, and my daughter, Samara, on the trail heading down. Photo by CS Sherin

Pescadero beach is another gem along Highway 1, not so far from Santa Cruz either.
Photo by CS Sherin

There are many fun tide pools to explore, sea birds around, and interesting paths up above, on, and around Pescadero Beach. Photo by CS Sherin

The next installment in this series will feature our trip to Muir Woods National Monument, where we got to spend an afternoon with the ancient giants. See you next week!

Photography: California Vacation, Part One

CS Sherin, August 1, 2019

We had a great time in the Bay area this July. From state beaches to seeing the ancient redwoods in Muir Woods, nature was where it was at — and is at. In general, we consider a good vacation one in which we can connect with nature, relax on a beach, encounter other cultures and diversity, and walk for many, many miles each day to explore nature and local experiences.

Being near the ocean and in the woods, and out in the sunshine with the cool ocean breezes brought me a great deal of peace, strength, and even some real, lasting rejuvenation. I am thankful for the experiences and movement.

To start, here are some close-ups from some of the hand full of state beaches we visited along Highway 1:


Mole Crab (upper left), mole crab skeleton (lower left and right) on San Gregorio State Beach, CA; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

Sea kelp washed ashore on San Gregorio beach. Photo by CS Sherin

Rock ledge at Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, CA that quickly got submerged by higher tides; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

Seagull prints in the sand at Natural Bridges beach. Photo by CS Sherin

A misty morning at Gray Whale Cove State Beach, CA; July 2019. Photo by CS Sherin

That’s all for part one of my California vacation photos. Stay tuned next week for another installment.

In the meantime, you can see more photos from this trip (that won’t be featured here) along with an article I wrote for the Rollerbag Goddess website — The Complete Guide To More Sustainable Travel. And if you haven’t visited the Rollerbag Goddess lately, they are up to some very exciting things over there. Go check it out, and I’ll see you next week. 🙂

Photography: Enduring Moments Outdoors

CS Sherin, July 17, 2019

We took a road trip to Decorah, IA about a week ago. We had never seen the 200 foot waterfall there, called Dunning Springs. The top of the waterfall starts from a small cave up towards the top of the bluff. The spring becomes a pretty impressive and relatively long and big waterfall. The naturally air conditioned air surrounding it was a bit of a heavenly welcome on a humid summer day.

My husband and our little dog weren’t able to climb all the way to the top of the trail along the waterfall, since it gets quite steep, slippery and hard to balance with a dog in tow. They let me go the extra five or so feet up, where I could see the origin of the spring that gushes, amazingly, into a vigorous and beautiful waterfall. This first photo is of three harmonious trees that stand right above and to the right of the waterfall, above where I stood.

Three trees above Dunning Springs, Decorah IA, July 2019.

The view of the source for Dunning Springs waterfall, Decorah IA, July 2019.
Photo credit: CS Sherin

Dunning Springs Waterfall, Decorah IA, July 2019.
Photo credit: CS Sherin

And here is the look of a happy, proud, sweet, thankful dog on a hike with her people.
Photo credit: CS Sherin

That’s all for today. I hope you enjoyed this week’s summer photo fun!

As always, if you would like to order a full resolution archival quality print or digital copy of any of my images or art, contact me.


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Photography: Moments Become Memories

CS Sherin, July 10, 2019

The cool thing about photography is that it provides an enduring insight into fleeting moments. This is one of the reasons I love it. As someone who has always preferred being outdoors as much as possible (with some exceptions), nature photography allows me to stay present with it even when I am indoors a lot of the time. There are usually important memories and moments that are strengthened and better remembered with the photos. With summer now in full swing, this is the time for exploration with my camera.

Here are some of my favorites that are also recent.

Peonies rise up to meet the azure sky.
June 2019

Leopard frog determinedly rests upon a lily pad, covered in cottonwood fluff.
June 2019

A chipmunk smiles for me in Hixon Forest.
July 2019

A little milkweed plant blossoms in my garden.
July 2019

As always, if you would like to order a full resolution archival quality print or digital copy of any of my images or art, contact me.

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Summer Deals On Wild Clover Services And Products

CS Sherin, July 3, 2019

Take advantage of these great summer deals!


25% off e-book purchase:
Recipe For A Green Life 2nd ed. e-book.
Coupon code: RKWWZ15US8.
Purchase here.
Expires Aug. 27, 2019.


50% off your first project:
Editing, proofreading, & research services.
New clients only.
Expires Sept. 3rd, 2019.


25% off your first astrology consultation.
Expires Sept. 3rd, 2019.


Image by Maklay62 from Pixabay